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Why did Jessie Pope write Who’s for the game?


The poem “Who’s for the game” is a famous piece of propaganda from World War I. It was written by Jessie Pope, a British poet, and journalist. The poem was published in 1915 and became very popular as it encouraged men to join the army and fight for their country. The poem is very simplistic in its language and its message, and it was undoubtedly written to encourage men to enlist.

Who was Jessie Pope?

Jessie Pope was an English poet, writer, and journalist. She was born in Leicester in 1868 and moved to London with her parents when she was young. She worked for several newspapers and wrote books before turning to poetry. Her first book, “Paper Pellets,” was published in 1907, and she went on to publish several more books of poetry throughout her career.

Pope was a controversial figure during her lifetime. She was accused of being a jingoistic, pro-war poet who glorified war and encouraged young men to enlist. Her poetry was condemned by later writers, including Wilfred Owen, who wrote in his famous poem “Dulce et Decorum Est” that Pope was “the poetess of patriotism.”

The Context of World War I and “Who’s for the game”

The poem “Who’s for the game” was written in 1915, when World War I had been raging for a year. The war had been expected to be a short conflict, but it had turned into a protracted and bloody affair that gripped the entire country.

At the time, there was a great deal of pressure on young men to enlist and fight for their country. This pressure came from the government, from the media, and from society as a whole. There was a strong belief that it was young men’s duty to fight and defend their country, and anyone who did not enlist was seen as a coward or a shirker.

It was in this context that Jessie Pope wrote “Who’s for the game.” The poem was a call to arms for young men who had not yet enlisted. It was aimed at men who were perhaps hesitant to go to war, or who were undecided about whether or not to enlist.

The Message of “Who’s for the game”

The poem “Who’s for the game” is a very simple and straightforward piece of propaganda. Its message is clear: young men should enlist in the army and fight for their country. The poem is a rallying cry for those who are unsure about whether or not to fight, and it makes use of a number of persuasive techniques to get its message across.

The poem begins with a call to action: “Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played? / The red crashing game of a fight?” Pope is using vivid language to describe war as an exciting and thrilling experience. She is also appealing to the competitive nature of young men, suggesting that the war is the ultimate test of strength and courage.

The poem goes on to describe the various benefits of enlisting. It promises adventure, excitement, and the chance to be a hero: “Who wants a turn to himself in the show? / And who wants a seat in the stand?” Pope is suggesting that enlisting will give young men the chance to be part of something important and exciting.

At the same time, the poem makes use of guilt and shame to persuade young men to join the army. It suggests that those who do not enlist will be seen as weak and cowardly. In the poem’s final lines, Pope writes: “Who’ll toe the line for the signal to ‘Go!’? / Who’ll give his country a hand?” This is a direct appeal to young men’s sense of duty and patriotism.

The Impact of “Who’s for the game”

“Who’s for the game” was a very popular poem at the time it was published. It appeared in a number of newspapers and magazines, and it was widely read by the public. The poem was seen as a powerful piece of propaganda, and it undoubtedly encouraged many young men to enlist in the army.

However, the poem’s legacy has been much more complex. In later years, it has been criticized for glorifying war and for encouraging young men to sacrifice themselves for a cause that was not always entirely clear. Writers like Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Robert Graves have been particularly critical of Pope’s work, accusing her of being naïve and misguided.

Despite these criticisms, “Who’s for the game” remains an important piece of literature from World War I. It provides insight into the political and social context of the time, and it highlights the power of propaganda in shaping public opinion. At the same time, it serves as a warning about the dangers of propaganda and the importance of questioning the messages that we receive from those in power.

Conclusion:

Jessie Pope’s “Who’s for the game” is a simple yet powerful piece of propaganda from World War I. It was written at a time when young men were under pressure to enlist in the army, and it was designed to encourage them to do so. The poem makes use of a number of persuasive techniques, including vivid language and guilt, to get its message across.

While the poem was undoubtedly successful in persuading many young men to enlist, its legacy has been much more complex. Critics have accused Pope of glorifying war and of encouraging young men to sacrifice themselves for a cause that was not always entirely clear. Nevertheless, “Who’s for the game” remains an important piece of literature from World War I and a reminder of the power of propaganda.

FAQ

What does the author compare going to war to in the poem who’s for the game?


In the poem “Who’s for the Game?” by Jessie Pope, the central idea revolves around the glorification of war. The author uses various comparisons to portray war as an exciting and thrilling event that everybody should want to participate in. One of the most significant comparisons made by the author is the comparison of war to a “game”.

Throughout the poem, Pope uses language that reflects the idea of war being perceived as a type of sport or game. She compares going to war to playing a game of cricket or football, claiming that it’s an exciting experience that everyone will enjoy. The poem’s first line, “Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played,” establishes this comparison right from the outset.

The use of the repetition of the words “who’s for the game?” throughout the poem further reinforces the idea of war being a competition that people should want to participate in. The author portrays war as a form of entertainment, and the use of language such as “game” and “sporting souls” suggests that those who go to war are doing so for fun and enjoyment.

Aside from comparing war to a game, Pope also compares it to a “picnic”. She describes soldiers marching off to war with enthusiasm, as if they’re going to a type of outing. The idea of war being a picnic reinforces the notion that it’s a fun and enjoyable experience.

Furthermore, the comparisons of war to a game and a picnic are important as they reflect the false perception people had of war. During the time this poem was written, World War I was ongoing, and people on the home front had little idea of the horrors of the war. The poem’s tone is upbeat, but it fails to capture the negative reality of war. Later, as the reality of the war became clear, such glorifications of war would be questioned and reevaluated.

The author compares going to war to a game in the poem “Who’s for the Game?” by using language, imagery and repetition to create a false perception of war being a fun and enjoyable experience. This comparison reflects the illusions people had of war during the time the poem was written and serves as a reminder of the need to understand the harsh realities of conflict.

What war poems did Jessie Pope write?


Jessie Pope was a British poet and writer during the early 20th century, known for her work during World War I. She wrote extensively on patriotic themes and was known for her pro-war stance, which led to both her popularity and criticism. Among her most famous works were her war poems which were published in three collections: War Poems (1915), More War Poetry (1915), and Simple Rhymes for Stirring Times (1916).

War Poems, Pope’s first collection of wartime poetry, was published in 1915, during the early stages of World War I. The poems in this collection were intended to appeal to young men who were considering enlisting in the British Army. The poems offered a romanticized view of war, portraying soldiers as brave and heroic, and the war as a noble cause. The collection includes works such as “Who’s for the Game?”, “The Call” and “The Zeppelin’s Passenger”.

More War Poetry was published later in 1915 and contained additional poems in the same patriotic vein. This collection included pieces such as “The Boy Scouts to the Rescue,” a poem that urged young boys to “do their bit” for their country, and “The Airman’s Toast,” a tribute to the bravery of fighter pilots.

Finally, Simple Rhymes for Stirring Times was published in 1916, and like her earlier collections of war poetry, it continued to promote the idea that war was a glorious and noble pursuit. One of the most well-known poems from this collection is “The Way to Victory,” which encourages soldiers with the lines, “Fight to the end and the victory’s ours/ And England’s glory forever flowers.”

While Pope’s work was popular among many people during the war, it was also criticized for its jingoistic nationalism and simplistic portrayal of war as a heroic adventure. In later years, her reputation as a poet suffered due to these criticisms, and her works fell out of favor with many readers. Nonetheless, Pope’s War Poems remains an important example of the poetic response to World War I and an insight into the attitudes towards the war during that time.

What is Jessie Pope’s most famous poem?


Jessie Pope was an English poet and writer, best known for her poetry during World War I. She wrote numerous poems that were published in her two collections, Jessie Pope’s War Poems and More War Poems, both published in 1915.

While Jessie Pope’s poetry was often criticized for being too jingoistic and glorifying war, it was still popular among the general public at the time. Her most famous poem is likely “Who’s for the Game?” which was published in August 1914, just as Britain was entering the war.

“Who’s for the Game?” is a patriotic recruitment poem that encourages young men to join the army and fight for their country. The poem makes war seem like a fun and exciting adventure, rather than the brutal and deadly reality that it was. It was widely distributed by the British government and used as a propaganda tool to recruit soldiers.

Here’s the full text of “Who’s for the Game?”:

Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played,
The red crashing game of a fight?
Who’ll grip and tackle the job unafraid?
And who thinks he’d rather sit tight?

Who’ll toe the line for the signal to ‘Go!’?
Who’ll give his country a hand?
Who wants a turn to himself in the show?
And who wants a seat in the stand?

Who knows it won’t be a picnic – not much –
Yet eagerly shoulders a gun?
Who would much rather come back with a crutch
Than lie low and be out of the fun?

Come along, lads –
But you’ll come on all right –
For there’s only one course to pursue,
Your country is up to her neck in a fight,
And she’s looking and calling for you.

While Jessie Pope’s poetry may not have stood the test of time as well as other war poets like Wilfred Owen or Siegfried Sassoon, her work remains an important representation of the attitudes and propaganda of the time.

Is Jess Pope Married?


Yes, Jess Pope is married. He will be tying the knot with his former rodeo teammate, Sydney Odle, in May. The couple got engaged in 2021 and decided to take their vows this year. Jess Pope is a renowned bareback rider and was declared the World Champion Bareback Rider by the PRCA in 2022. He has a brother named Ty Pope who is also a rodeo professional, and they often travel together to various rodeo circuits to compete. Jess Pope has been active in the rodeo industry for several years and has made a name for himself as a skilled, courageous, and hard-working athlete. He has been a role model to many aspiring rodeo professionals and has inspired many to follow their dreams. Jess Pope’s personal life is just as successful and fulfilling as his professional life, and he is set to embark on a new adventure with his soon-to-be wife.